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Healys’ Employment Team have a strong reputation, providing businesses with top level, pragmatic, strategic and commercial advice – whatever your needs. Technical excellence and a deep knowledge of people management is a given.

We recognise that the management of people issues captures more than just knowledge of employment law, and we work closely with our clients to seamlessly manage any issues that arise in the workplace. Our clients range across many public and private sectors, including financial services, care, retail, construction, and recruitment. We work with businesses of all sizes, including large corporations and SMEs.

We also have an excellent track record of acting for individuals, particularly those working in financial services, but also people employed or otherwise engaged at a senior level in many other business sectors. We have a genuine understanding of issues that impact on HR professionals.

Supporting Employers & HR

  • Employment law advice and practical guidance for businesses
  • Business protection and restrictions
  • TUPE and its application to outsourcing, and the sale and acquisition of businesses
  • Restructuring
  • Workplace data privacy
  • Employment Tribunal and High Court litigation
  • Employment law training
  • Investigations
  • Workplace mediation
  • Reputation management and audits

Supporting Individuals

  • Protecting individuals’ reputations
  • Advising on employment contracts and negotiation before joining a new employer
  • Concluding and advising on settlement agreements
  • Advising on post-termination restrictions in employment contracts and share plans
  • Advising on grievance and disciplinary matters to protect and preserve individuals’ interests
  • Fighting claims of bullying and harassment
  • Supporting individuals suffering from stress at work
  • Pursuing complaints of unfair dismissal, discrimination, and breach of contract

International Advice

  • Support to overseas businesses with interests in the UK
  • Employment support to law firms for international clients

Keeping you up to date

Healys provides regular information and updates about employment law – including:

  • Our employment newsletter
  • Analysis of employment law issues on the Healys website
  • One-off email alerts on important developments
  • Our employment law tweets
  • A programme of workshops and breakfast update
Call Us Today
Call our London office on 020 7822 4000 or our Brighton office on 01273 685 888. You can also contact us online.
Call Us Today
London: 020 7822 4000 Brighton: 01273 685 888 Or you can contact us online: Contact Us
Employment capabilities
Employment experiences
Employment insights
  • Court Of Appeal Rules Uber Drivers Are Workers

    9th January 2019

    The Court of Appeal has upheld the decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) that drivers who use online taxi company Uber’s app are ‘workers’ within the meaning of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA), rather than self-employed contractors, and thus have the right to be paid the National Minimum Wage or the National Living Wage and to receive holiday pay. However, the Court has given the company permission to appeal to the Supreme Court (Uber BV and Others v Aslam and Others). Continue reading »

  • Sleep-In Shifts And The National Minimum Wage

    4th January 2019

    In a guideline ruling, the Court of Appeal recently found that on a straightforward reading of the National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999, two care workers who were expected to sleep for all or most of their shifts and were provided with suitable facilities were entitled to be paid the National Minimum Wage (NMW) for time when they were required to be awake for the purpose of performing some particular task, but not for time when they were asleep (Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Jaikishan and Another). Continue reading »

  • Part-Time Workers And Discrimination

    The Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 established a minimum standard of fairness for part-timers so that they cannot be treated less favourably than comparable full-time co-workers, unless the treatment is justified on objective grounds. Continue reading »

  • Expatriate Workers And The Territorial Reach Of British Employment Law

    3rd January 2019

    The general rule is that employees who work outside Britain cannot bring complaints before domestic Employment Tribunals (ETs). However, as a guideline Court of Appeal decision showed, there are exceptions and the issue of where the territorial reach of UK employment law finds its limits is highly fact sensitive (The British Council v Jeffery). Continue reading »

  • Employee Copyright Agreement Achieved Legitimate Aim, EAT Rules

    2nd January 2019

    Many employers require their staff to sign copyright agreements by which they give up their intellectual property rights to designs or other works created in the course of their employment. In an important decision concerning a luxury leather goods manufacturer, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) ruled that one such agreement was a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim (Gray v Mulberry Company (Design) Limited). Continue reading »

Employment awards
Employment news
  • Tesco Facing Record Equal Pay Claim – What Employers Should Know

    12th February 2018

    In what could be the largest ever equal pay challenge in UK history, legal proceedings have begun against retail giant Tesco. Up to 200,000 shop floor staff could be affected by the claim, which has the potential to cost Tesco up to £20,000 per worker in back pay over at least 6 years. If successful, the final compensation bill could be as much as £4bn. Continue reading »

  • Uber Has Lost Its Appeal

    10th November 2017

    In 2016 the Employment Tribunal decided that Uber drivers were entitled to workers’ rights, such as holiday pay, paid rest breaks and the minimum wage.

    Uber appealed to the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT), arguing its drivers were self-employed and under no obligation to use its booking app. Continue reading »